An algorithm that reads images poetically

“They smelled the strings,” said Manson and he said, “I’m going to have a beer.”

Sometime ago I came across the work of Ross Goodwin and his extraordinary WORD.CAMERA project. The extremely talented Mr Goodwin has developed a free web application which, when you capture or upload a photograph to it applies algorithms to determine the objects and concepts present in the image and then produces a text passage in response to what it has identified. It is very clever with obvious images of ‘things’ but when presented with more complex, less obvious, images ‘things’ can get really interesting. Take this image of sand and mud washed by a beach stream; the algorithm does very well when generating nouns to describe what is there but when it then attempts to write a short piece of prose poetry based on the image we move quickly into the sureal – or the world of William Gibson, I’m not sure which is odder.

WORD.CAMERA has, I think, considerable potential as a keyword generator, producing a much wider range of nouns than I would ever come up with – not all useful perhaps, but an interesting way to stimulate how I think about my images and much more fun than using a theasarus.

On a previous visit to WORD.CAMERA using a very different image it gave me the word ‘Woodsy’ which I treasure.

nature, outdoors, fabric, snow, no person, desktop, wear, pattern, mountain, geology, art, abstract, color, eruption, wave, rock, desert, texture, stone, volcano
A no person, a desktop, and a pattern.
“They smelled the strings,” said Manson and he said, “I’m going to have a beer.” “How do you know?” “Well, I can’t believe he was the sixty-new Commander.
A texture, a rock, and a nature, a predator’s meaning to the dark, Now the doctor is real lady and not blood in his hands.

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Author: Hares on the Hill

I am a designer and photographer. I live with my wife and our two dogs in the Welsh Marches, a land full of history, legends, mountains, rivers and dragon's breath; a place where animism thrives. To our north are the Cambrian Mountains, the Elenydd, a vast plateau so ancient that its mountains now have the appearance of steeply rounded moorland hills; to the east is England; to the south stand the Black Mountains and in the west the Brecon Beacons rise around the twin summits of Pen y Fan and Corn Du, the highest mountain in West Wales.

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